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This edition continues celebrating 15 years of WRAP and focuses on "Taking WRAP into the Future, the next 15 Years and Beyond". Also In this issue...."WRAP Goes to High School", Japanese WRAP Workbook, WRAP Correspondence Course, articles by Mary Ellen Copeland and Matthew Federici.

How do we feel about use of the term "mental illness"? The phrase is prevalent in mental health and may continue to be broadly used for quite some time. To the extent that its use destigmatizes (because it can mean "I am not crazy" and "I am not bad"), it is a good thing. To the extent that it validates the uniqueness of someone's experience and helps providers be empathetic, it is a good thing. To the extent that it helps find statistically valid and empirically confirmed biochemical or genetic aspects of mental health problems to create a wider range of effective treatment tools, it is a good thing.

But the New Freedom Commission and Uniformed Services Package say mental health care must be transformed to reflect the principles of the Recovery Model.

In this issue....answers to your questions about WRAP as an evidence-based practice; a message from Dr. Copeland; wellness tools for everyone and more.

Download the 2012 Summer issue featuring a special celebration of 15 years of WRAP. Read an article by Dr. Mary Ellen Copeland about the complete history of the development of WRAP; WRAP Around the USA, with updates about WRAP from all over the country; Copeland Center upcoming events, and more.

This study examined changes in psychosocial outcomes among participants in an eight-week, peer-led, mental illness self-management intervention called Wellness Recovery Action Planning (WRAP).

The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the outcomes of two statewide initiatives in Vermont and Minnesota, in which self-management of mental illness was taught by peers to people in mental health recovery using Wellness Recovery Action Planning (WRAP).

The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a peer-led illness self-management intervention called Wellness Recovery Action Planning (WRAP) by comparing it with usual care.

WRAP came out of a body of knowledge and research that Mary Ellen Copeland, PhD, completed in the past 20 years. Today, there is a lot of research taking place uses WRAP.

This...information is from studies designed to find out how people who experience psychiatric symptoms deal with these symptoms and help themselves feel better. The researcher and the study participants are people who have been told that they have a psychiatric or mental illness.

There is hope.  People get well, stay well for long periods of time, and do the things they want to do with their lives. Self-determination, personal responsibility, empowerment, and self-advocacy are expected outcomes of  WRAP.

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